Cal  Thomas

Katherine Kerstin, chairman of the Center of the American Experiment in Minneapolis and a commentator for National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," wrote about Brown's "seductive philosophy" of unfettered freedom in 1997 for the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. It has a catch, she wrote: "For if 'freedom' is women's birthright, it is also men's. And as the last inhibition bites the dust, women are finding they don't much like some of the things men do when released from social constraints and expectations. The result? A new breed of 'Thou shalt nots' -- from sexual harassment policies in the workplace ('No compliments on hair or dress, if you know what's good for you'), to the mandatory 'date rape' seminars that greet unsuspecting college freshmen."

Having abandoned a code of conduct that has served humanity well for millennia, Brown and her followers were forced to write a new code to deal with the predictable result of bad male behavior that previous constraints had worked well to limit. Men wanted their cake "and Edith, too," to paraphrase a country song and women didn't like the end result.

Brown sowed the wind, to borrow a biblical phrase, and millions of women who ingested her poison continue to reap the whirlwind. What a legacy.


Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
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