Cal  Thomas

Far from being a spent force, as many predicted, individual citizens are rediscovering a power many may have thought they no longer possessed. Heading into the 2012 election, this renewed sense that the power to make or break a nation does not reside in Washington, but rather in the hearts and minds of its citizens, will add to a sense of hope that real change is about to happen.

While tea party critics are re-reading the Constitution, they should also consult the Declaration of Independence. That philosophical foundation of the Constitution reserves the right of the people to change their government when it no longer serves the interests of its citizens. The Declaration outlined the proper relationship between government and citizens, noting that government derives its "just powers from the consent of the governed" (and) "whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness."

The British no doubt considered those who wrote and believed such things "terrorists." We call them patriots. And those patriots just might force the vice president and his boss out of a job next November. That is their right. They have it in their power.

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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
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