Cal  Thomas

A society that readily tolerates 45 million legal abortions (and counting) and feels a need to "do something" about the financial "burden" of the sick and elderly is not likely to be morally aroused at the destruction of embryos, even for cloning and other experimental purposes. Besides, aren't we killing in order to live? Isn't the goal of healing diseases and lengthening life worth any cost? Only in a world in which the self is deified and nothing stands in the way of getting whatever will give us pleasure and make us "happy."

If a horror like partial birth abortion does not shock our moral sensibilities, it is unlikely that destroying human embryos, which have sufficient chromosomes to become fully developed babies, will get our attention.

Romney's comments came after a bill was introduced to clear up ambiguities in Massachusetts law and allow such research. It's difficult to predict what the mostly Democrat Massachusetts legislature will do, though some members stand with the governor in his opposition to therapeutic cloning and research on embryos created to be killed.

Perhaps a majority will come to their senses after considering how we got to this point and where we'd be headed, should the few protections remaining for human life be removed.

Do legislators want scientists to decide by themselves what is right, moral and ethical just so this grisly business can be conducted for profit and "prestige" in Massachusetts? It is unlikely legislators would grant such unrestricted power to any other profession or industry.

If Romney wins this battle, he will have done so on principle. Perhaps his stand will serve as an example of what can happen when a politician puts more noble things ahead of self-interest.


Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
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