Brent Bozell

A Washington Post critic scoffed on August 24: "It is doomed to win precious few converts. It's a textbook example of preaching to the choir. It has the air of a 'Nightmare on Elm Street' sequel, pandering to the franchise's hardcore fans, while boring everyone else."

And "An Inconvenient Truth" was different?

On August 29, ABC's David Wright told D'Souza his film was "disingenuous" in suggesting Obama wanted to downsize America's power and influence, and complained "D'Souza spins out the conspiracy theory" of America in dramatic economic and geopolitical collapse by 2016. The screen read "Conspirator-in-Chief."

NPR weekend anchor Guy Raz took a few rhetorical swings at D'Souza in a September 1 interview. "Dinesh D'Souza, if you wanted to criticize or attack President Obama, why bend the truth? Why not just offer a policy critique rather than conjecture, and in many cases in this film, conspiracy?"

But what dominated Al Gore's documentary if not a gloomy conjecture about the destruction of the planet through global warming? Wasn't Gore a "Conspirator-in-Chief" that some people deny the "truth" of impending planetary doom for nefarious political ends? Gore's film ridiculously claimed a 20-foot rise in sea level that would flood Manhattan.

The media weren't negative about that conjecture. ABC's story on Gore's movie was summed up with the words "The Comeback Kid? Al Gore Takes On The World."

Reporter Claire Shipman hailed "Gore's personal journey toward environmental evangelism." On NPR, anchor Robert Siegel hailed the film's success, and began with a "quibble" and moved on: "Our science correspondent had only a couple of quibbles on claims about the melting snows of Kilimanjaro or the increasing power of hurricanes." Gore quickly shot that down as unworthy. And The Washington Post reviewer (Desson Thomson) raved: "We're pressure-cooking the planet to death -- and Al Gore has the flow charts to prove it. We know what you're thinking, but as this surprisingly absorbing film shows, Gore's lectures are anything but dull."

D'Souza's movie was comparable to an over-the-top horror movie. Al Gore has proven we're all about to bake and/or drown, and all that can be said about that spooky spectacle is it is "surprisingly absorbing." Their arrogance knows no bounds.

L. Brent Bozell III is the president of the Media Research Center. To find out more about Brent Bozell III, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

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Brent Bozell

Founder and President of the Media Research Center, Brent Bozell runs the largest media watchdog organization in America.
 
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