Brent Bozell

Last year, the AP reported Mrs. Clinton attended a showing of "The Book of Mormon" on Broadway from the strenuously religion-bashing "South Park" creators, apparently without holding a press conference before or after the musical to declare "We condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions."

Islamic exceptionalism really showed its ugly head when the elites started arguing in national newspapers that the video creator should be jailed. On September 13, USA Today put forward religion professor Anthea Butler to declare she wouldn't have jailed the makers of "The Last Temptation of Christ," but she would jail the anti-Muslim director because he "indirectly and inadvertently inflamed people half a world away, resulting in the deaths of U.S. Embassy personnel."

That's not only factually untrue, since we've learned the Libya attack had nothing to do with YouTube. It grants Muslim radicals a permit to jail any artist they feel has insulted Islam. And what of the millions of Christians insulted by that hideous Jesus movie?

Even so-called journalists have supported censorship. Sarah Chayes, NPR's past Paris Bureau Chief for six years, wrote in the Los Angeles Times on September 18 that his video was "not, arguably, free speech protected under the U.S. Constitution" because it inflames radicals half a world away. In her long experience in Afghanistan, she has seen Pakistani radicals use any "pretext" for riots -- and she wants those "pretexts" removed from the Internet.

She calls the video "speech that is deliberately tailored to put lives and property at immediate risk." Like many Islamic exceptionalists, she claimed "heightened volatility" in the Mideast demands a crackdown: "such provocation is certainly irresponsible -- and reveals an ironic alliance of convenience between Christian extremists and the Islamist extremists they claim to hate."

One satirist put this hyperbole in perspective. Fouad Ajami recounted a mock Twitter statement by Syrian dictator Bashar Assad, presently butchering his Muslim subjects. "Wow, it's good that I've been killing women and children. It's good I've been shelling mosques," said the fake tweet. "Imagine what would have happened had I made an anti-Muslim video. They would have really come after me."

L. Brent Bozell III is the president of the Media Research Center. To find out more about Brent Bozell III, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

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Brent Bozell

Founder and President of the Media Research Center, Brent Bozell runs the largest media watchdog organization in America.
 
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