Brent Bozell

Talk radio used to be a forum for public service. Now, too often in America, talk radio is a forum designed to turn men on with a level of sexual raunch unimagined 15 years ago.

In the increasingly daring attempts to shock and titillate, the only obstacle is public protest, and the only agency to address those protests is the Federal Communications Commission, a bureaucratic dinosaur that crawls at a glacial pace. On Oct. 2, more than 13 months after shock jocks "Opie and Anthony" were fired by Infinity Radio, the FCC finally found that a radio show encouraging sex in St. Patrick’s Cathedral on the day Catholics celebrate the Virgin Mary’s assumption into Heaven could be defined as an obscenity violation. How this decision took longer than 13 minutes, at least by any non-government entity, is beyond me.

How grievous a message does that send to multibillion-dollar conglomerates? Even the FCC noted these stunts went beyond shocking listeners -- they encouraged sex in very inappropriate public places with children present, involving "unsuspecting people who were otherwise going about their business," including sacred moments in church.

So what fine did the FCC levy? A whopping, utterly meaningless $27,500 for each of the 13 stations that aired this sacrilege. That fine didn’t hurt; it tickled the corporate funny bone.

Infinity is the radio behemoth behind much of this raunch. It has an appropriate name -- its capacity for crotch talk is endless. It can fire Opie and Anthony, but still rake in profits from Howard Stern, and Don and Mike, and others. It can begin each broadcast day of boob-butt-dildo-thong-sperm-strip stimulation with an airing of the National Anthem, saluting America for the freedom to use the public airwaves to create a foul stream of moral corruption.

On the same day that Infinity was "punished," the FCC handed out a fine to Washington, D.C., station DC-101, owned by the enormous Clear Channel radio chain, for incidents on May 7 and May 8, 2002. It took almost 17 months to adjudicate this: In their contest to recruit girls to dance in a cage at a Kid Rock concert, the "Elliot in the Morning" crew interviewed two girls who said they were students at Bishop O’Connell High School, a Catholic school in Arlington, Va.

Shock jock Elliot Segal tried to make the audio-ogling most of these eager teenagers and soon had the star-struck girls eating out of his palm. "Are you kind of like an exhibitionist?" Yes, said the first girl. "And you want to flash from time to time?" Yes. "What size bra?" She obliged. From there, Segal leapt into the lurid, asking whether the girls lined "guys up against lockers" for oral sex in the hallway. "Two or three," she claimed.


Brent Bozell

Founder and President of the Media Research Center, Brent Bozell runs the largest media watchdog organization in America.
 
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