Bill Murchison

I was watching only the other day an independent film (you know, like Al Gore?) on bias in higher education, and, lo, a bearded academic had the gall to inform us that "whiteness" is "an oppressive social category." I think they used to call this condition "institutional racism." You were a racist by mere participation in the life of an institution traditionally dominated by the white folks. See how easy to qualify! You didn't have to wear a bedsheet to earn the stigma once reserved for plantation overseers or Confederate privates.

Alas, the parties making such accusations never made known justify their intellectual premises. Mere assertion does the job. The white man, especially the Southern white man, gets no credit for honorable performance, or, for that mattter, civilized emotion. Witness Duke University and the Great Lacrosse Charade -- the mendacious prosecution of three college students for alleged gang rape on the say-so of a black stripper whose "plight" inspired 88 faculty members, in a newspaper ad, to cry out against the Duke campus' "racism" and "sexism."

It's trendy, in other words, to advertise your own repudation of white "advantage" by attacking the advantaged whenever the chance presents itself.

So no conversation about race. Not until the great majority of those who learned their politics in the '60s are tucked away six feet under. Maybe not even then, such is the tenacity of their example. White America cast off segregation (and good riddance). It opened doors all over our national home to those previously denied admission. It now looks not unkindly on the presidential candidacy of a man of mixed race. Pretty good work for a bunch of institutional racists, mightn't we want to acknowledge?


Bill Murchison

Bill Murchison is the former senior columns writer for The Dallas Morning News and author of There's More to Life Than Politics.
 
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