Bill Murchison

My distinguished profession, the media, works from a design, which is to highlight that which is new and interesting. Fair enough. Obama is new and interesting. As is the whole phenomenon of whooping and shouting and, occasionally, fainting when he comes center stage. Shades of Rudolph Valentino! I beg to report that Valentino wasn't running to succeed Calvin Coolidge as president. He was exhibiting himself. It sufficed. Does Obama's self-exhibition suffice? For some, yes. For the more deeply curious, the coming Republican-McCainite exhibition of Obama's economic ideas will be a lot more interesting to watch. Hard questions are gong to get asked, and soft answers ("I'm working for all people" and such) aren't going to fly.

Is this to point to the perfection of the John McCain economic program, whatever it might turn out to be? Not a bit. The Republicans have an obligation equivalent to Obama's -- to put forth a realistic program that won't bankrupt us or diminish our freedoms. In these early days of vote-wooing, specifics count less than the bouquets and male fragrances with which the suitor shows up at the front door. Once inside the house, it's different. We want to know some things about this guy. We want some answers! Answers he had better supply, with trademark fluency and some yet-untested transparency. ... Only I intuit already those answers may not be very good ones.


Bill Murchison

Bill Murchison is the former senior columns writer for The Dallas Morning News and author of There's More to Life Than Politics.
 
TOWNHALL DAILY: Be the first to read Bill Murchison's column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com daily lineup delivered each morning to your inbox.
 
©Creators Syndicate ©Creators Syndicate


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP