Ben Shapiro
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A&E's indefinite suspension of "Duck Dynasty" star Phil Robertson over his comments regarding homosexuality, and the subsequent backlash, is an important cultural moment in American life.

For the first time in decades, traditionally religious Americans have come out of the closet en masse to speak out against anti-religious bigotry from proponents of gay rights. This, in turn, has made many on both the right and left uncomfortable: uncomfortable with a loud and proud segment of religious believers standing up for the expression of Biblical views, and uncomfortable with the notion of such religious believers being allotted a seat at the political and cultural table.

In all likelihood, Robertson will eventually be reinstated by A&E. In the meantime, we can learn some valuable lessons from this culture clash. Hollywood hates conservatives and kowtows to GLAAD. It's been an open secret in Hollywood for years that the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation routinely prescreens many television shows and movies, vetting them for anti-homosexual biases.

This began in the 1980s, when NBC actually invited the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force to provide input on programming. CBS has changed the writing of its shows to add gay characters after receiving a flunking grade from GLAAD; GLAAD forced the Vince Vaughn flick "The Dilemma" to cut a joke about an electric car being "gay." The story is different with conservatives. Anti-religious bigotry runs rampant on television, which is why A&E tried to cut "Jesus" from the Robertson family prayers. It is no surprise to find that GLAAD called A&E before A&E dropped Robertson.

Americans like conservatives on TV. Conservatives are routinely pilloried on television. A&E likely greenlit "Duck Dynasty" in the first place because executives believed Americans would laugh at the redneck antics of the self-described "white trash" family. This is the same reason CBS originally greenlit "All in the Family" -- it believed Norman Lear's Archie Bunker would be universally derided. Robertson is no Bunker, but they do have this in common: The American people resonated to them. And liberals in Hollywood can't stand when Americans resonate to conservatives on television.

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Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro is an attorney, a writer and a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center. He is editor-at-large of Breitbart and author of the best-selling book "Primetime Propaganda: The True Hollywood Story of How the Left Took Over Your TV."
 
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