Austin Bay

Washington's high-decibel debate over funding U.S. military operations in Iraq has utterly drowned out one of the most important voices we must consider in any substantial discussion of goals and consequences: the voice of the Iraqi people.

Enter Marc Danziger. Danziger works for a software company in California and -- using the wry pseudonym "Armed Liberal" -- writes for the Website WindsOfChange.net.

Late last week, Danziger sent an email that began:

"As most of you know, I'm a liberal Democrat (pro-gay marriage, pro-choice, pro-progressive taxation, pro-equal rights, pro-environmental regulation, pro-public schools) who supported and supports the war in Iraq. As I tell my liberal friends, "Did I miss the part where it was progressive not to fight medieval religious fascists?"

"I've been waiting for four years," Danziger added, "for the White House to start explaining the war to the American people and to do anything sensible at all to maintain the political capital necessary to keep America in the fight -- to keep us from withdrawing because the war is too messy, or too long, or just plain makes us feel bad."

Danziger decided to post to the Web video interviews from Iraq. He was involved in a charity that sent humanitarian aid to Iraq and, as a result, came in contact with many Iraqis. "I've asked them," he wrote, "to simply film a message they would send in responses to Americans who want to withdraw right now."

I immediately went to the Internet and watched the first video, featuring a young, smiling Iraqi man. Replying to the question, "What will precipitous withdrawal produce in Iraq?" the fellow says, in Arabic, "I believe there will be chaos and more death, and all security will be lost."

Modern information technology empowers individuals, often with spectacular effects. Political activists are wise to those effects, so skepticism is in order. Witness the "Hillary Clinton as Big Sister" video placed on YouTube by a Barack Obama campaign worker. Obama received an advertising windfall when that attack video migrated to TV networks. No question, Danziger is running a personal, low-budget, donation-driven opinion campaign. He intends to form his own political action committee. The man wants the world to hear the voices of Iraqis he knows exist.

I promised him a small donation so he can shoot more videos. Why? The interviews are credible -- I've heard similar Iraqi opinions. Agreed, Danziger's videos are selective, but he'll counter that these are Iraqis interviewing Iraqis whom CNN and Fox don't know. I'll support that experiment.


Austin Bay

Austin Bay is the author of three novels. His third novel, The Wrong Side of Brightness, was published by Putnam/Jove in June 2003. He has also co-authored four non-fiction books, to include A Quick and Dirty Guide to War: Third Edition (with James Dunnigan, Morrow, 1996).
 
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