Ashley Herzog

Needless to say, students who acknowledge a “moral dimension” of sexuality are often treated like pariahs in this environment. When Harvard’s Anscombe Society ran a poster campaign last Valentine’s Day, they were defaced and torn down by angry students. Two of Milano’s female classmates wrote into the school paper, calling the group “sexist” and the poster campaign “demeaning and offensive.” They tossed around the name Sandra Fluke. (And here I assumed Harvard students would be more creative!) On college campuses, porn star lookalike contests aren’t considered “demeaning and offensive” to female students, but posters promoting love and commitment are.

“Through their sexual health programming, course reading lists, and administrative policies, many of today’s colleges and universities reinforce the attitude that anything goes in matters of sex so long as it is consensual,” says Caitlin Seery of the Love and Fidelity Network, an umbrella organization that supports Anscombe. “Conversation surrounding sex on college campuses is therefore often one-sided, making it difficult for those who believe and live otherwise.”

The Anscombe Society rejects the notion that any sexual activity deemed “consensual” is therefore exempt from analysis or criticism. They said so loud and clear when Harvard granted official recognition to Munch, a student BDSM group.

“Consent does not make a violent, abusive, or humiliating act suddenly non-violent, non-abusive, or non-humiliating,” the Anscombe Society wrote in a press release. “The bottom line is this: If you think there isn’t enough violence, abuse, and humiliation in the world, then you should support the recognition and funding of groups dedicated to associating sexuality with these social evils. If you think that there is already too much violence, abuse, and humiliation in the world, then you should join us in asking Harvard to reconsider its support for this group.”

That’s quite a diversion from the anything-goes, who-are-we-to-judge orthodoxy imposed by campus porno culture. After receiving complaints about the brutal BDSM demonstration during Sex Week, Yale administrators issued this statement: “While the administration may find aspects of SWAY [Sex Week At Yale] distasteful and offensive, Yale’s policies on free expression permit students to invite the widest range of speakers.”

Really, Yale? How much wimpier can you get?

It’s clear to me that the young members of the Anscombe Society have more wisdom, more values, and more guts than their elders. These students deserve our support for standing up to the pornified powers that be on their campuses.


Ashley Herzog

Ashley Herzog can be reached at aebristow85@gmail.com.