Alan Reynolds

I was first turned on to economics in 1962 by an enthusiastic teacher who made the subject exciting, Ernest Buchholz at Santa Monica College. I quickly began reading everything I could get my hands on, just so that I could argue with him. We stopped arguing a long time ago (we're friends), but I kept on reading anyway. Today, economics is as much a hobby for me as it is a job. If you enjoy mysteries and puzzles, you should love economics. And if you hate math, that's no problem.
 
In the fall of 1971, an enthusiastic 14-year-old came to meet me where I worked, at J.C. Penney in Sacramento, Calif. He was reading National Review, where I had just published my second article, and wondered what books he should read. I suggested "Economics in One Lesson" by Henry Hazlitt, "The Road to Serfdom" by F.A. Hayek and "Capitalism and Freedom" by Milton Friedman. That young man was John Fund, who has since become a celebrated member of The Wall Street Journal editorial board.


Alan Reynolds

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